Thursday, August 11, 2011

Ejections: Vic Carapazza (5)

HP Umpire Vic Carapazza ejected Mets Batting Coach Dave Hudgens for arguing a strike three call to end the bottom of the 5th inning of the Padres-Mets game. With two out and three on, Mets batter Nick Evans took a 1-2 slider from Padres pitcher Cory Luebke for a called third strike. Replays indicate the pitch was located thigh high and over the inner half of home plate, the call was correct. At the time of the ejection, the Mets were leading, 2-0. The Padres ultimately won the contest, 3-2.

This is Vic Carapazza (85)'s fifth ejection of 2011.
Vic Carapazza now has 11 points in the Umpire Ejection Fantasy League (6 Previous + 3 AAA + 2 Correct Call = 11).
Vic Carapazza was not drafted in 2011.

This is the 154th ejection of 2011.

Wrap: Padres at Mets 8/11/11
Video: Carapazza Throws Out Hudgens

Pitch f/x courtesy Brooks Baseball

15 comments :

Anonymous said...

How is it possible that 4 people have already said this is an incorrect call even though the Pitch F/x clearly shows the pitch well within the strike zone? Must be Mets fans!!!

Anonymous said...

It is possible and it happens. I have seen pitches on ESPN K-Zone that ended up in the dirt be ruled a strike by the computer.

Jared said...

Pitch f/x measures the pitch at the front edge of home plate, so there is ample opportunity for a slider/curve/sinker to dramatically drop off and end up in the dirt, while passing through the strike zone at the front of the plate.

Juan said...

Good movement on the pitch, good call at the plate.

Anonymous said...

http://mlb.mlb.com/video/play.jsp?content_id=17914491

tmac said...

If you looked the where Evans' back knee was at the time it crossed there the ball was still knee high.. now granted evans has lowered that knee considerably BUT a strike is a strike.

This was a fairly consistant game for Vic who i'm sure will be a forum favorite. Only 12 missed strikes for balls. But the bottom of the zone is rough.

http://www.brooksbaseball.net/pfxVB/cache/zoneplot.php-pitchSel=all&game=gid_2011_08_11_sdnmlb_nynmlb_1&sp_type=1&s_type=7.gif

Jon Terry said...

http://mlb.mlb.com/video/play.jsp?content_id=17914491

Video is up.

Looks like the catcher didn't exactly help him out there. And screw that announcer and his 'rabbit ears' crap. You can bet that coaches in the dugout aren't exactly whispering. They want to be heard, and then whine when the umpire reacts.

Anonymous said...

so the strangest thing happened in the AAA game between buffalo and syracuse tuesday night. With 2 outs the batter hits a hard grounder to the short stop. The first baseman runs towards first for the putout, but his toe catches the corner of the bag and it flips out of the dirt and rolls a couple feet away(all before the ball got there). the first baseman then catches the ball and tags the base while the runner touches the area where the bag was supposed to be. the umpire ruled that it was an out. Is this correct, or could it be open for interpretation.

OSheaman said...

That's a great pitch. Wish the Cubs could throw like that :(

Anonymous said...

@Jon Terry--you're exactly right about the catcher making the pitch look lower than it was. Just by turning the mitt palm up, that pitch is going to look 2-3" higher

@Anon 8:32P--I'm not an umpire, but I think I can figure this one out.

The closest thing I could find was Rule 7.08c. There is an "approved ruling" which states:

"If a base is dislodged from its position during a play, any following runner on the same play shall be considered as touching or occupying the base if, in the umpire’s judgment, he touches or occupies the point marked by the dislodged bag."

To me, that states that, should a base suddenly go missing, it's the area where it _should_ be that's important. And, while it only mentions the running, logically the same rule should apply to the fielder as well.

I haven't seen any video, but if the first baseman had possession of the ball and touched the area that the bag should have been (even accidentally) before the runner did, then I would think it's a good call

Anonymous said...

The ball had more over spin than it did speed. Once the spin exceeded the velocity, which was near the plates front edge, the spin took over. If you watch the replay again, I think your all being a little harsh on the catcher. The pitch dropped dramatically in the last 18 inches. And let's remember, had the catcher made the pitch look bad, he wouldn't have gotten the call. He caught it exactly where the ball tracked to. He didn't try to frame it, and because of that the umpire was able to see that yes it did cross good, and that, yes that's where the ball should have been caught. If in the umpires judgement, those to criteria are met, it's most likely going to be called a strike.

Who were the announcers? Wow, they were bad!

Anonymous said...

Well the first baseman touched the actual bag, the runner touched where it should have been. So he would have been safe, call incorrect?

Anonymous said...

The first baseman actually tagged the batter runner on that play, hence the reason for being called out!

Cricket said...

This pitch isn't really close...It was a damn breaking ball. Ron Darling is an idiot.

tmac said...

@ Cricket That was Keith Hernandez... The booth for that game consisted of Keith, Gary Cohen, and Ralph Kiner

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