Friday, April 4, 2014

MLB Instant Replay Review 026: Kerwin Danley (01)

Instant Replay Review confirmed 2B Umpire Kerwin Danley's safe call in the top of the 5th inning of the Orioles-Tigers game. With none out and one on, Orioles batter Nick Markakis hit a 1-2 slider from Tigers pitcher Drew Smyly on the ground to second baseman Ian Kinsler, who threw to shortstop Andrew Romine as Orioles baserunner R1 Steve Lombardozzi arrived at second base. Upon Instant Replay Review as the result of a challenge by Tigers Manager Brad Ausmus, Danley's ruling that Romine did not catch or possess the ball while in contact with second base was affirmed, the call was correct. At the time of the review, the Tigers were leading, 7-2. The Tigers ultimately won the contest, 10-4.

This is Kerwin Danley (44)'s first Instant Replay Review/Challenge of 2014.
Kerwin Danley is now 1/1 (1.000 Affirmation Rate) in Instant Replay Reviews during 2014.
Crew Chief Gary Cederstrom's crew is now 2/2 (1.000 Affirmation Rate) in Replay Reviews during 2014.
Listed Replay Official Crew Chiefs: Larry Vanover, Jeff Kellogg.

This is the 26th Instant Replay Review of the 2014 MLB Regular Season.
Tigers Manager Brad Ausmus is now 2/3 (.667 Affirmation Rate) in Instant Replay Challenges/Reviews during 2014.
Umpires are now 17/26 (.654 Affirmation) in Instant Replay Reviews during the 2014 MLB season.

Wrap: Baltimore Orioles vs. Detroit Tigers, 4/4/14
Video: Play stands; Ausmus loses first Manager's Challenge after replay confirms initial out call (DET)

14 comments :

Gil Imber said...

As we've talked about.. the definition of "voluntary release" has changed. Which means the definition of a catch has changed or at least the interpretation therein This is the 3rd time already we've seen this already this season. See Dale Scott review from earlier in the week.
Here's the problem... To have voluntary release (which this is) you first must have on this play secure possession and momentum of catch completed. We have that. So now we must redefine what voluntary release is. It's eliminated from the catch essentially because now for a play to be ruled a catch you'd need the ball in your throwing hand starting your throwing motion and then drop it. Confused yet? This play is going to cause controversy all year and umpires will take the muddy end of the stick by making this a safe call.
Correct judged and well timed by Danley. If this is what your bosses want then you do it. Otherwise let's not reinvent the wheel.

Gil Imber said...

This affects us at the amateur level as well. Like us, the players, fans, and coaches watch these game and these replays. This will trickle down to our levels especially since the definitions are largely the same. This involves a gloved ball as opposed to a "catch" correct?

Gil Imber said...

From JEA catch:












A CATCH is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession in his hand or glove of a ball in flight and
firmly holding it; providing he does not use his cap, protector, pocket or any other part of his uniform in
getting possession. It is not a catch, however, if simultaneously or immediately following his contact with
the ball, he collides with a player, or with a wall, or if he falls down, and as a result of such collision or
falling, drops the ball. It is not a catch if a fielder touches a fly ball which then hits a member of the
offensive team or an umpire and then is caught by another defensive player. If the fielder has made the
catch and drops the ball while in the act of making a throw following the catch, the ball shall be adjudged
to have been caught. In establishing the validity of the catch, the fielder shall hold the ball long enough
to prove that he has complete control of the ball and that his release of the ball is voluntary and
intentional.



Official Notes - Case Book - Comments: A catch is legal if the ball is finally held by any fielder, even though
juggled, or held by another fielder before it touches the ground. Runners may leave their bases the instant the first
fielder touches the ball. A fielder may reach over a fence, railing, rope or other line of demarcation to make a catch.
He may jump on top of a railing, or canvas that may be in foul ground. No interference should be allowed when
a fielder reaches over a fence, railing, rope or into a stand to catch a ball. He does so at his own risk.
If a fielder, attempting a catch at the edge of the dugout, is "held up" and kept from an apparent fall by a player
or players of either team and the catch is made, it shall be allowed.

Gil Imber said...

The portion of the rule (definition) that applies to this play is "If a fielder has made the catch and drops the ball while in the act of making a throw following the catch, the ball shall be adjudged to have been caught."

Gil Imber said...

Jaksa/Roder discusses a "gloved ball" which is defined by them as "only batted or pitched balls that are airborne can be caught. By definition, batted and pitched balls that are not airborne and any thrown ball cannot be caught, but can be gloved. A ball is gloved when a fielder gains possession of the ball in his hand or glove, other than a catch.

Gil Imber said...

I know this isn't NCAA, but I think the verbiage of their rule is worth reading. It's much more concise than OBR:

Catch: The act of a fielder in getting secure possession in the hand or glove of a ball in flight and firmly holding it, providing the fielder does not use the cap, protector, pocket or any other part of the uniform in getting possession.

In establishing the validity of the catch, the fielder shall demonstrate complete control of the ball and that the release of the ball is voluntary and intentional.

Art. a.

If the fielder has made the catch and drops the ball while in the act of making a throw (i.e., reaching for the ball in the glove) after the catch, the ball shall be judged to have been caught.

Art. b.

If a fielder falls over or through the fence after making a catch within the field of play, the batter shall be retired and the ball is dead (see 6-1-d and 8-3-m).

Art. c.

It is not a catch if, simultaneously with or immediately after contact with the ball, the fielder collides with a player or fence or falls down and, as a result, drops the ball.

Art. d.

It is not a catch if a fielder touches a fly ball that then hits a member of the offensive team or an umpire and then is caught by that fielder or another defensive player.

Art. e.

It is not a legal catch if either foot is touching dead-ball territory when the catch is made (see 6-1-d, item 4).

A.R. -- Only two circumstances may be interpreted as creating a voluntary and intentional release.

(1) When the momentum of the catch is complete; i.e., the fielder has reversed his direction and is running the ball back toward the infield or;

(2) When the fielder is reaching for the ball to make a throw.

Gil Imber said...

My problem with how they are seeing this is that they seem to be looking for a successful release of the baseball and not just a voluntary one. It is clear the ball was never firmly in the bare hand, but it is also clear he intentionally let it come out of his glove in order for his hand to grab it. To me, that release from the glove is what needs to be voluntary. The fact that his bare hand never secured it upon trying to take it out should be a mute point.

Gil Imber said...

If this play was a simple force out, say with two outs, would the runner be called out then?

Gil Imber said...

Moot point*

Gil Imber said...

So Matheny's argument is that R3 intentionally got hit by that throw? I can't sell that - I'd no call that too.

Gil Imber said...

Yes there will be.....and it will be 3,000 more minutes of being able to brand major league baseball. This has so little to do with getting the calls right.

Gil Imber said...

yes.. and that is a BIG problem

Gil Imber said...

Nail on the head!!! This just gives the bashers ammo.

Gil Imber said...

Or you could be like Bryce Harper and say something really stupid before anyone has a chance to review it, leading to your ejection.

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